Electrician (ELE)

Fourth Period Package (42 Modules) Comments

Date: 5/31/2019 11:16:28 PM
Module: 030405a
Version: 12
Page: 24
Comment: Would you please check on the DCF (Table D3) formula and add clarification to the ILM as to whether you use the rated conductor temperature or the Conductor allowable ampacity, based on termination temperature. The Masters course offered by NAIT uses Termination Temperature to determine the conductor ampacity and this makes sense based on rule 4-006. Our ILM uses the 90 deg ampacity based on Table 2, yet gives termination temperature of 75 deg 0
Status: Approved

Date: 5/31/2019 11:16:29 PM
Module: 030405d
Version: 12
Page: 4
Comment: first sentance of page 4 reads If a conductor is 3m or less and fulfills the requirements of Rule 14-100(c), it may be smaller than required by Rule 14-100(b) and still be acceptable. if we are going to make a statement like this an example would have to be provided to back this up as this is a very unlikely event and may cause confusion for student
Status: Approved

Date: 12/2/2019 3:51:39 PM
Module: 030405e
Version: 21
Page: 40
Comment: The answer to Question 1 should be FT6, not FT4. According to 2-130 Appendix B, FT4 rated conductor is suitable for combustible and non-combustible buildings. FT6 is also rated for the above-mentioned construction and may be used in a plenum as the question mentions. Consider supplying code rule and reference to the appendix as feedback for the question.
Status: Approved

Date: 5/31/2019 11:16:29 PM
Module: 030405g
Version: 12
Page: 5
Comment: First paragraph line five states subrule (2) subrule(3) should be subrule (3) subrule(4)
Status: Approved

Date: 5/31/2019 11:16:30 PM
Module: 030405g
Version: 12
Page: 16
Comment: second paragraph line 2 states a no. 10AWG 90C conductors has an allowable ampacity of 35 A A No 10 AWG from the 75 degree colomn has an allowable ampacity of 35A from the 90 degree colomn the allowable ampacity is 40A Suggest changing too- from the 75 degree colomn the allowable ampacity for the No. !0 AWG 90 degree would be 35A
Status: Approved

Date: 10/22/2019 11:04:59 AM
Module: 030405g
Version: 21
Page: 19
Comment: The code rule in the second paragraph needs to be changed from 8-104 5) a) to 8-104 6) a)
Status: Approved

Date: 10/11/2019 3:15:56 PM
Module: 030405h
Version: 21.0
Page: 21
Comment: For the service calculation, everything is correct with the calculations. The issue is we should be saying T-4 and T-39 both use a 4/0awg with a 200A service. By just mentioning T-4 you may assume T-39 is not considered. If I’m incorrect in my interpretation please get back to me.
Status: Approved

Date: 5/31/2019 11:16:30 PM
Module: 030405i
Version: 14
Page: 24
Comment: 3rd paragraph If locked rotor current is not listed on the equipment nameplate, it is assumed to be six times the full load current rating. (we do not have to assume cec gives us a value to use) should read If locked rotor current is not listed on the equipment Refer to Rule 28-010 Locked rotor current rating where not marked, deemed to be equal to six times the FLA rating from the nameplate
Status: Approved

Date: 11/12/2019 12:07:15 PM
Module: 030405n
Version: 21
Page: 12
Comment: When listing the two types of insulation shielding, bullet 1 "Non-metallic insulating shielding" is italicized while bullet 2 is not. Make consistent.
Status: Approved

Date: 11/12/2019 12:07:30 PM
Module: 030405n
Version: 21
Page: 26-35
Comment: Objective 5 has many formatting errors.
Status: Approved

Date: 5/31/2019 11:16:30 PM
Module: 304051
Version: 12
Page: 20
Comment: Question 5, obj. 2 The term 'may be' denotes permission to do something. The given answer is False for this question. It should be True. You may install equipment approved for Class1, Div 1 locations in a Zone 0. The question does not state any requirements. So, as long as specific requirements are met, YOU MAY INSTALL class1 div 1 equipment in zone 0
Status: Approved